Institut Jean Nicod

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Présentation

Aesthetics and Cognitive Science (ÆCS)

 

Contact : Jérôme Dokic, Filippo Contesi or Enrico Terrone.

Funded by IRIS (Initiative de Recherches Interdisciplinaires et Stratégiques), « Création, cognition, société » (CCS), Paris Sciences et Lettres (PSL).

Practical information / Accessibility

 

 

 

Tuesday 19 June, 14h-16h
Salle Ribot, 29 rue d’Ulm
(you can enter also from 24 rue Lhomond (round the corner on your left) and then follow the directions for Bâtiment Jaurès).
Katerina Bantinaki (University of Crete, directrice d’études invitée à l’EHESS)
"On the Possibility of Aesthetic Perception"

 

Wednesday 20 June, 14h-16h
Salle Ribot, 29 rue d’Ulm
(you can enter also from 24 rue Lhomond (round the corner on your left) and then follow the directions for Bâtiment Jaurès)
Amy Kind (Russell K. Pitzer Professor of Philosophy, Claremont-McKenna College)
"The Myth of Imaginative Resistance"

 

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Workshop on Depiction

Tuesday 26 June and Wednesday 27 June

Salle Ribot and Salle Séminaire du DEC, 29 rue d’Ulm

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Past sessions

Friday 17 November 2017, 14h-16h
salle du pavillon Jardin, 29 rue d’Ulm, 75005, Paris
Michael Martin
(University College London and University of California, Berkeley)
"Relishing Fine Strokes"



Wednesday 22 November 2017, 14h-16h
salle Séminaire du DEC, 29 rue d’Ulm, 75005, Paris
Palle Leth (Stockholm University)
"Metaphor as Initiating Discursive Play"

 

Wednesday 7 February 14h-16h
Salle Séminaire du DEC, 29 rue d’Ulm
Clare Mac Cumhaill (Durham)
"Still-Life, a Mirror’"

 

Thursday 15 February 2018, 11h-13h
Salle Langevin, 29 rue d’Ulm
Olivier Massin (CNRS-IJN)
"Feeling Values"

 

Friday 2 March 2018, 14h-16h
Salle Langevin, 29 rue d’Ulm
Bruno Trentini (Université de Lorraine)
"Embodied aesthetics and contemporary art : An ecological approach"

 

Friday 9 March, 14h-16h
Salle Séminaire du DEC, 29 rue d’Ulm
John Kulvicki (Dartmouth and Institut d’etudes avancees, Paris)
"Metaphor in pictures"

Abstract

Are there pictorial metaphors, and if so how should we understand them ? There is relatively little literature on metaphor in pictures, even though there is an extensive literature on metaphor. Josef Stern defends an interesting pair of theses. First, he is one of the few advocates of a semantic account of metaphor. Second, he insists that there are no distinctively pictorial metaphors. The negative claim is based on how he understands the ways in which pictures can be meaningful. I want to show how, if you have a different account of pictorial meaning, his account of metaphor applies in interesting ways to pictures. This is part of a larger project meant to bring topics in the philosophy of language into contact with issues related to pictorial representation.

 

Tuesday 17 April 2018, 14h-16h
Salle Langevin, 29 rue d’Ulm
(you can enter also from 24 rue Lhomond (round the corner on your left) and then follow the directions for Bâtiment Jaurès)
Ned Markosian (Massachussets-Amherst)
"What Are Novels ?"

Abstract

Paintings and sculptures are normally thought of as physical objects, while novels, poems, and musical compositions are often taken to be abstract objects. But this popular combination of views leads to striking dissimilarities among these different genres. Some artists, it seems, are creators, and others are mere discoverers. Partly in response to this puzzle, philosophers have defended various theses about the ontology of art objects. One recent theory that is gaining momentum holds that novels (and poems and perhaps musical compositions) are abstract artifacts. An advantage of the abstract artifact view is that it allows us to say that novelists, poets, and composers all create their works of art. But a disadvantage is that it is difficult to say exactly what abstract artifacts are. In this talk I will offer three alternative accounts, according to which novels (and poems and perhaps musical works) are concrete artifacts (like paintings and sculptures). I will introduce these new accounts by first defending a general theory of art, according to which art is a social practice. On this theory, almost anything can be an art object (provided it plays the right role in the relevant kind of social practice). Then I will propose and explain the three new views I want to propose. And, finally, I will explore some of the consequences of these new proposals, in an effort to show that they fit surprisingly well with our ordinary intuitions about the relevant works of art.

 

 

 

 


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